Fullerton

 

HISTORY OF FULLERTON

In early 1887 the California Central Railroad, a subsidiary of Santa Fe, was looking for land and sent George H. Fullerton, president of the Pacific Land and Improvement Co., also a Santa Fe subsidiary, to purchase land for railroad right-of-way.  George and Edward Amerige learned that a likely site for a town was located north of Anaheim

With George Fullerton’s assurance that the area north of Anaheim would be included, the Ameriges purchased the 430 acres. On July 5, 1887, Edward Amerige drove a stake into a mustard field at what is now the corner of Harbor Boulevard and Commonwealth Avenue, and the townsite of Fullerton was born. The appreciative community voted to name the town in honor of its benefactor, George Fullerton.

 

WHERE DOES FULLERTON CITY WATER COME FROM?

Your drinking water is a blend of mostly groundwater from the Orange County groundwater basin and also surface water imported by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD). Approximately 75 percent of the City’s water supply is provided by 10 groundwater wells. Your groundwater comes from a natural underground reservoir that stretches from the Prado Dam and fans across the northwestern portion of Orange County, excluding the communities of Brea and La Habra, and stretching as far south as the El Toro ‘Y’. The City also has 6 imported water connections that help supplement the City’s water demands. MWD’s imported water source primarily originates from the Colorado River and the State Water Project from northern California.

 

ARE THERE CONTAMINANTS IN FULLERTON CITY WATER?

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the
the surface of the land or through the layers of the ground it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animal and human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment

plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and

wildlife.

Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production or mining activities.

Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining and farming.

Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gasoline stations, urban stormwater runoff, agricultural application, and septic systems

 

SHOULD I DRINK AND BATHE WITH FULLERTON CITY WATER STRAIGHT FROM MY FAUCET?

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised people, such as those with cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have had organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly persons and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.

The USEPA and the federal Centers for Disease Control guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Eastern Time (7 a.m. to 1 p.m. in California)- source: 2017 Fullerton consumer confidence report.

https://www.cityoffullerton.com/gov/departments/public_works/water_system/water_quality/understanding_fullerton_water.asp