Stanton

HISTORY OF THE CITY OF STANTON

The City of Stanton is located in northwestern Orange County. With a population of more than 39,000 in 3.1 square miles, residents enjoy a small-town community feeling. The City was incorporated in 1956 and has enjoyed growth and prosperity since that time. The City’s motto – Community Pride and Forward Vision identifies Stanton as a place where innovation and pride in the community are an important aspect of life in Stanton. Community excitement comes from the revitalization of commercial and residential areas, and the attraction of major new developments created through an active redevelopment program. Stanton residents enjoy major retail opportunities, active civic volunteers and business-friendly City organizations. Residents benefit from a wide variety of programs provided by the City which include great parks, a family resource center, annual holiday events and programs which support taking pride in ownership.

Modern Stanton can trace its origins to one of the largest land grants made in California – a concession which covered over 300,000 acres of land. Manuel Perez Nieto, the successful petitioner, found his grant reduced approximately one-half following a protest by the padres of Mission San Gabriel. Upon Manuel Nieto’s death in 1804, his son Juan Jose, took title to Rancho Los Coyotes and Rancho Los Alamitos. Following his confirmation of the title to the lands in 1834, then-governor Jose Figueroa proceeded to purchase Rancho Los Alamitos (28,000 acres) from Juan Jose Nieto for $500, or less than 2 cents an acre. He, in turn, sold the Rancho in 1842 to Don Able Stearns for $6,000. Stearns, born in Massachusetts, was one of the first American immigrants to arrive in California in 1829.

 

WHERE DOES STANTON CITY WATER COME FROM?

Golden State Water has proudly served Los Alamitos and surrounding communities since 1929. We currently serve approximately 27,200 customers in Cypress, Los Alamitos, Stanton and portions of Buena Park, Garden Grove, La Palma, Rossmoor, and Seal Beach.

Water delivered to customers in the West Orange County System is a blend of groundwater pumped from the Orange County Groundwater Basin and imported water from the Colorado River Aqueduct and State Water Project (imported and distributed by Metropolitan Water District of Southern California)

 

ARE THERE CONTAMINANTS IN STANTON CITY WATER?

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the
the surface of the land or through the layers of the ground it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animal and human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production or mining activities.

Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining and farming.

Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gasoline stations, urban stormwater runoff, agricultural application, and septic systems

 

SHOULD I DRINK AND BATHE WITH STANTON CITY WATER STRAIGHT FROM MY FAUCET?

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised people, such as those with cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have had organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly persons and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.

The USEPA and the federal Centers for Disease Control guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Eastern Time (7 a.m. to 1 p.m. in California)- source: 2017 Stanton Water consumer confidence report.

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