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Garden Grove

HISTORY OF THE CITY OF GARDEN GROVE

The area was explored by Gaspar De Portola in 1769 and was part of Rancho Los Nietos, a Spanish land grant made to Manuel Nieto in 1784. The modern city now occupies parts of Ranchos Los Alamitos, Las Bolsas, and Los Coyotes. Garden Grove was founded in 1874 by Alonzo Cook, and it developed as a small farming community until a railway link was completed in the early 20th century and the city began to grow. Two disasters struck in the first decades of the 20th century: a major flood covered the city in several feet of water in 1916, and an earthquake destroyed much of the older sections of the city in 1933. After WW2, when many servicemen who had been stationed in Orange county made southern California their home, Garden Grove became one of the fastest-growing cities in the United States. Among its leading industries are construction, services, aerospace, and biotechnology.

WHERE DOES GARDEN GROVE CITY WATER COME FROM?

Your drinking water is a blend of mostly groundwater from 12 wells in the Orange County groundwater basin and also surface water imported by MWDSC. MWDSC’s imported water sources are a blend of State Water project water from northern California and water from the Colorado River Aqueduct. Your groundwater comes from a natural underground reservoir managed by the Orange County Water District (OCWD) that stretches from the Prado Dam and fans across the northwestern portion of Orange County, excluding the communities of Brea and La Habra, and stretching as far south as the El Toro ‘Y.’

Last year, as in years past, your tap water met all USEPA and State drinking water health standards. The City vigilantly safeguards its water supplies and once again we are proud to report that our system has never violated a maximum contaminant level or any other water quality standard. This brochure is a snapshot of last year’s water quality. Included are details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to Federal and State standard

ARE THERE CONTAMINANTS IN GARDEN GROVE CITY WATER?

The sources of drinking water for Santa Ana’s residents (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the
surface of the land or through the layers of the ground it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animal and human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production or mining activities.

Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining and farming.

Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gasoline stations, urban stormwater runoff, agricultural application, and septic systems

 

SHOULD I DRINK AND BATHE WITH GARDEN GROVE’S CITY WATER STRAIGHT FROM MY FAUCET?

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised people, such as those with cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have had organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly persons and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.

The USEPA and the federal Centers for Disease Control guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Eastern Time (7 a.m. to 1 p.m. in California)- source: 2017 Anaheim Water consumer confidence report.

https://ggcity.org/city-files/GG-2018-WQ-Report-(English).pdf