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Villa Park

HISTORY OF THE CITY OF VILLA PARK

 

Here, you will find people with a wide range of backgrounds, interests, and occupations; quiet neighborhoods and attractive residential streets; the lowest crime rate in the County; and four schools within walking distance. The City of Villa Park is in the center of Orange County. It has an area of 2.1 square miles, a population of 6,500 and approximately 2,050 homes, and is almost 99% built out. With the exception of one shopping center, the City is zoned for single-family residences, most of which are on half-acre lots. The shopping center includes a grocery store, banks, a pharmacy with a postal substation, a variety of specialty shops and offices, the City Hall and community room, and a branch of the Orange County Public Library.

Villa Park High, Cerro Villa Middle, Villa Park Elementary and Serrano Elementary – are a part of the Orange Unified School District. There is no city newspaper, but the “Foothill Sentry,” a local paper published in Orange Park Acres once a month, includes the Villa Park news and events, and a periodic newsletter from City Hall. Cable TV is available with a public access channel, Channel 3. There are no churches within the City limits but most denominations’ facilities can be found close by.

Due to Villa Park’s central location and proximity to the freeway system, the wealth of cultural, social, recreational, business and philanthropic activities that Orange County offers are all within easy access.

Villa Park was not incorporated until 1962, but the history of the area goes back to around 1860. It was known in its early days as Mountain View. Villa Park came into usage when a post office was located here and there already was a city of Mountain View in northern California.

 

WHERE DOES VILLA PARK’S CITY WATER COME FROM?

Villa Park’s water supply is a blend of local native surface water and imported Metropolitan Water District (MWD) water impounded within Santiago Reservoir. Additionally, groundwater is pumped from the local aquifer managed by OCWD that stretches from the Prado Dam and fans across the northwestern portion of Orange County, excluding the communities of Brea and La Habra, and stretching as far south as El Toro.

 

ARE THERE CONTAMINANTS IN VILLA PARK’S CITY WATER?

The sources of drinking water for Villa Park residents (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the
the surface of the land or through the layers of the ground it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animal and human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production or mining activities.

Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining and farming.

Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gasoline stations, urban stormwater runoff, agricultural application, and septic systems

 

 

SHOULD I DRINK AND BATHE WITH VILLA PARK’S CITY WATER STRAIGHT FROM MY FAUCET?

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised people, such as those with cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have had organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly persons and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.

The USEPA and the federal Centers for Disease Control guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Eastern Time (7 a.m. to 1 p.m. in California)- source: 2017 Anaheim Water consumer confidence report.

 

VILLA PARK WATER QUALITY REPORT

http://www.serranowater.org/pdf/SWD_WaterQualityReport.pdf