fbpx

Orange

HISTORY OF ORANGE

The City of Orange was incorporated on April 6, 1888, under the general laws of the State of California, however, Orange dates back to 1869 when Alfred Chapman and Andrew Glassell, both lawyers, accepted 1,385 acres of land from the Rancho Santiago de Santa Ana as legal fees.

Historic Plaza

Soon thereafter, the men laid out a one square mile town with ten-acre farm lots surrounding a forty-acre central townsite. The center of the townsite became known as the Plaza, which has become the symbol of the city.

Today, the Plaza and the majority of the original one square mile town site, contain many homes and buildings dating to the early days of the City; the site is registered on the National Register of Historic Places.

The City of Orange, with a population of 138,640 is situated in Central Orange County, approximately 32 miles southeast of Los Angeles. The City’s land area is 27 square miles. The City’s planning area is 38 square miles, with a “Sphere of Influence” area of 55 square miles. Included in the City’s Sphere of Influence is 18,500 acres of undeveloped land owned by The Irvine Company.

Under a council-manager form of government, a mayor is elected every two years and four council members are elected to four-year terms alternating on a two-year basis. The City Manager, who is the administrative office of the City, is appointed by the City Council.

 

WHERE DOES ORANGE CITY WATER COME FROM?

Orange’s water comes from three sources. The primary source is groundwater drawn from 12 municipal wells drilled about 1000 feet into the Santa Ana River Aquifer. Well, water goes directly into the distribution system, is disinfected with chlorine and meets all state regulations. The second source is water imported by the Metropolitan Water District, from the Colorado River and northern California (San Francisco-San Joaquin Bay-Delta). Metropolitan water is filtered and disinfected with chloramines. Orange also purchases a small amount of water from the Serrano Water District. This source is primarily treated surface water, but also includes local treated well water.

 

ARE THERE CONTAMINANTS IN ORANGE CITY WATER?

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the
the surface of the land or through the layers of the ground it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animal and human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production or mining activities.

Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining and farming.

Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gasoline stations, urban stormwater runoff, agricultural application, and septic systems

 

SHOULD I DRINK AND BATHE WITH ORANGE CITY WATER STRAIGHT FROM MY FAUCET?

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised people, such as those with cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have had organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly persons and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.

The USEPA and the federal Centers for Disease Control guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Eastern Time (7 a.m. to 1 p.m. in California)- source: 2018 Orange consumer confidence report.

https://www.cityoforange.org/DocumentCenter/View/6916/Consumer-Confidence-Report-2018?bidId=