La Palma

HISTORY OF THE CITY OF LA PALMA

With 18 dairies dotting an area of 1.76 square miles, the City of La Palma in 1955 looked nothing like it does today. In fact, the City of La Palma was first incorporated as Dairyland and remained so until the dairies relocated.

The name was changed in 1965 to La Palma in reflection of Orange County’s Spanish heritage and the City’s main street, La Palma Avenue. Soon after the small farming community began its life, City planners decided that the City should benefit from a long-term program for orderly development.

The Civic Center and Central Park, now La Palma’s premier gathering places, were among the first projects to be completed to better the community. The City’s major redevelopment project, Centerpointe, added new commercial and light industrial uses in the early 1980s.

La Palma is a well-balanced city that prides itself on a responsive municipal government and a strong sense of community. The City’s small-town character allows residents to live in quiet and friendly neighborhoods. With one of the lowest crime rates in Orange County, La Palma is a place where residents can rest easy and enjoy hometown living. The City has been ranked one of America’s Best Places to Live, by Money Magazine in 2007, 2011, 2013, and 2015.

 

 

WHERE DOES LA PALMA CITY WATER COME FROM?

Orange County’s water supplies are a blend of groundwater managed by the Orange County Water District (OCWD) and water imported from Northern California and the Colorado River by the Municipal Water District of Orange County (MWDOC) via Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWDSC). Groundwater comes from a natural underground aquifer that is replenished with water from the Santa Ana River, local rainfall, and imported water. The groundwater basin is 350 square miles and lies beneath north and central Orange County from Irvine to the Los Angeles County border and from Yorba Linda to the Pacific Ocean. More than 20 cities and retail water districts draw from the basin to provide water to homes and businesses.

 

ARE THERE CONTAMINANTS IN LA PALMA CITY WATER?

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the
the surface of the land or through the layers of the ground it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animal and human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment

plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and

wildlife.

Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production or mining activities.

Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining and farming.

Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gasoline stations, urban stormwater runoff, agricultural application, and septic systems

 

SHOULD I DRINK AND BATHE WITH LA PALMA CITY WATER STRAIGHT FROM MY FAUCET?

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised people, such as those with cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have had organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly persons and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.

The USEPA and the federal Centers for Disease Control guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Eastern Time (7 a.m. to 1 p.m. in California)- source: 2017 La Palma Water consumer confidence report.

https://www.cityoflapalma.org/DocumentCenter/View/7925/La-Palma-2018-WQR?bidId=